Tag Archives: Romance

Terror Touches Me

terrortouchesme

Terror Touches Me
Stanton Forbes | Pyramid Books | 1967 | 150 pages

Hey! I didn’t even eat the [salmon] mousse.” — Debbie Katzenberg (Michael Palin), Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life (1983)

Following the death of her father, and her sister Connie’s recent marriage, Mary Owen reacts to the depressing thought of spending her life alone by impulsively marrying a man she briefly met at the wedding ceremony. Eamon Doyle, a roguish, gold-toothed Irishman and business acquaintance of Connie’s husband, sweeps Mary off her feet, and takes his new bride to live at his family’s ancestral home outside Dublin. However, other than the gray skies and peat fire in the hearth, little is made of the Irish setting.

Arriving unannounced with Eamon at Doylescourt, a ramshackle castle with sprawling grounds, Mary discovers an unexpected tension amongst the family members residing there. Eamon’s father, Sean Doyle, seems engaged in a much-repeated argument regarding the future direction of the family estate with his children: Brendan, the oldest and most somber, more interested in botany than the family business; Liam, straggly-bearded bohemian and musician in a pub band; and Angela, unreadable under her cool demeanor and blank expression.

Just the same, there is something—some kind of violent undercurrent that I feel, only feel. Even their quarreling is deeper—deadlier than the usual family disagreements even though is seems to be about nothing of importance.

Mary’s observations about the Doyles prove to be prescient. On her very first evening the entire family is stricken after a shared dinner of smoked salmon. Although Mary was unaffected, Eamon’s father collapses, and shortly thereafter dies from an unknown illness. The police ultimately trace the cause of death to a poisoned bottle of whiskey, and conclude that one member of the household is a murderer.

More murders quickly follow, as Eamon’s siblings succumb one by one to mysterious poisonings. The only commonality seems to be Mary, present with each of the victims at the various times and places of their deaths. A growing suspect in the eyes of the police, Mary nevertheless confronts an inescapable conclusion—her own husband is responsible for the shocking crimes. Although he is a man she barely knows, could he really be a cold-blooded killer?

A passable entry in the newlywed-trapped-with-her-sinister-new-family category of gothic fiction, Terror Touches Me fails to generate much suspense on two fronts. Although surrounded by death, Mary never seems to be in immediate jeopardy, since she doesn’t appear to be a primary target herself. Also, even though she becomes a person of interest to the police, the dragnet of wrongful accusation around Mary as a serious suspect never closes in too tightly.

About two-thirds of the way through the story, Mrs. Ryan, the cook, professes to have heard a banshee keening outside her kitchen window, indicating a foreboding spirit lurking on the grounds of the estate. Unfortunately, nothing comes of this possible encounter—supernatural or otherwise—just a failed opportunity to lift the proceedings above the expected inheritance drama.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

The Secret of the Chateau

secretchateau

The Secret of the Chateau
Caroline Farr | Signet Books | 1967 | 128 pages

“You!” I ejaculated in English, “are the most . . . !”

“You,” I managed, “are the most insufferable . . . !”

When our young heroine, Denise Gérard, sputters out these words to Etienne Métier, a roguishly good-looking man she meets after a near-deadly encounter on lands owned by her uncle, little doubt exists that they will soon kiss, and within a hundred or so pages, be married. This overt telegraphing of direction characterizes all aspects of The Secret of the Chateau, a perfectly serviceable gothic thriller that holds virtually no surprises from start to finish.

Denise leaves her home in New Orleans following the death of her grandfather, traveling to the Châtaigneraie region of France at the bequest of Maurice Gérard, an uncle she has never met. The reclusive Maurice, a former war hero from the time of the French Resistance, desires to re-establish contact with his last surviving family member. He advances her a large sum of money to visit him at his manor, the Château-Les-Vautours, a massive bulk that reminds Denise of a prison.

Denise discovers Maurice to be a moody figure, wearing a black velvet mask to cover the extensive burns on his face received during the war, and a metal prosthetic in place of his missing right hand. She is shocked by his casual cruelty when she witness him shooting pigeons, slowed after consuming a scattering of drugged seeds on the grounds of the estate, their remains ostensibly left to feed the manor’s namesake vultures. His surly, masculine housekeeper, Gabrielle, and heavy-set chauffeur, Albert, display a barely concealed contempt for Denise, and exert an unusual hold over Maurice, seemingly out of place for their role as servants.

Warned not to travel to the village alone, Denise learns of a series of strange disappearances involving young women. The countryside takes on an additional sense of menace after Denise encounters Etienne, one of Maurice’s tenants on the estate’s farmland. Etienne immediately confides his true identity to her by declaring outright, “I am an agent of the French government,” and expressing his theory that an infamous German war criminal is currently hiding in the region.

All the story elements fall exactly into their prescribed places, but The [Not-So] Secret of the Chateau harbors enough of the requisite baroque trappings—a gloomy estate, a disfigured lord in a velvet mask, a group of suspicious servants, vultures ominously circling around a spot inside the forest, and a brooding mystery involving the young women of the village—to potentially provide some gothic comfort food for the inclined reader.

***Spoiler Alert*** The only real surprise came when Gabrielle was NOT ultimately revealed to be a man in disguise—just big hands, apparently. ***End Spoiler***

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Masque of Satan

masqueofsatan

Masque of Satan (Lucifer Cove Book Four)
Virginia Coffman | Lancer Books | 1971 | 192 pages

The one-sentence tag line for this fourth outing in the occult series perfectly boils down the story to such a degree that reading its entire page count seems entirely optional.

The story of MISS JEAN BENEDICT, who came to the Cove to save a soul—until the lure of its evil threatened her own…”

Young missionary Jean Benedict arrives at Lucifer Cover, the hedonistic spa and resort on the isolated California coast, at the request of Edna Shallert, a former member of Jean’s Disciples Revival. Jean’s determination to uncover the “inconceivable menace” mentioned in Edna’s letter for help is fortified when she discovers that Edna now belongs to the Devil’s Coven, a satanic temple high on the hillside above the resort. But before she has the opportunity to meet Edna, or confront Nadine Janos, the High Priestess of the coven, Jean discovers the body of Edna’s paramour hanging in her hotel room.

Comforted by Marc Meridon, the darkly attractive and mysterious spa owner, Jean finds herself more and more drawn to the many luxuries offered to the residents of Lucifer Cove. Justifying her extended stay at the spa as just another mission to convert lost souls, she begins to image herself as a possible romantic rival to Christine Deeth, Marc’s current love interest. Unusual noises outside her window at night, along with the scent of freshly turned earth, hint to Jean that greater mysteries are unfolding in Lucifer Cove.

Book Four of the Lucifer Cove series offers a rather straightforward tale of a naïve young girl coming to covert those tempted by the seductive offers of evil, but instead becoming the object of conversion herself. Previous readers of the series will already know what activities are taking place behind the false fronts of the Tudor-style houses lining the main street of Lucifer Cove, so any true sense of mystery is leeched from the proceedings. Returning characters, such as Nadine Janos and her Irish handyman, O’Flannery, aren’t given much of a role, and perceived villain Dr. Rossiter remains something of an enigma.

Interestingly, Jean’s ultimate battle against evil hinges not on her own unwavering goodness, or a careful plan of attack against any inherent weakness in her devilish adversary, but instead on a technicality in a seemingly binding legal document—begging the question, doesn’t Satan surely have better attorneys at his disposal?

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Brooding House

broodinghouse

The Brooding House
Alice Brennan | Prestige Books | 1965 | 254 pages

Young, red-haired nurse Larcy Ryan accepts a position as live-in caretaker for David Magnam, a terminal patient living in a rambling house on the shores of Lake Huron. Larcy finds David to be a disagreeable man, always mocking and insulting, referring to her as “Miss Bedpan”. He also exists in a constant state of paranoia regarding the possible malevolent actions of his own family. Sharing the estate is David’s daughter Bena, whose navy husband is out to sea, and her niece, Lyn, whose mother died in a mental institution. Lyn, a badly behaved adolescent, does justify David’s paranoia by confiding with Larcy about Bena,

She needs his money, and she isn’t going to get it until dear David is dead.”

From that foundation, The Brooding House builds itself into an inheritance melodrama, with Larcy fearing that a plot is afoot to kill David for his money. She overhears incriminating snatches of conversations between Bena and a strange man on the beach, and spots her meeting with another suspicious character in the town diner. When the body of Bena’s former brother-in-law turns up at the beach, Larcy becomes convinced that evil machinations are actually underway.

Strange coming-and-goings from David’s room, incriminating newspaper clippings, and the aloof housekeeper’s use of poison, ostensibly for rat traps outside the kitchen, all add to the general atmosphere of menace at the lake house. When Larcy witnesses a strange scene at the pier one night, her own safety becomes directly involved in the events.

As much a nascent romance as a thriller, Larcy finds time to reflect on the nature of love throughout all the mysterious unfolding of events. Although suspicious of Bena’s actions, Larcy admires the relationship between her and her husband, Johnson, whose portrait commands attention in the house while its subject is out to sea. Larcy envies the apparent “fireworks” between the couple, evident in Bena’s emotional longing, but absent with her own prospective fiancée, Pete Crimmins.

Pete, the boy-next-door type, comes off as something of a heel later in the story, when Larcy turns to him for help. However, for all his alleged romantic charms, Johnson doesn’t rate much better. Bena, assessing her own slenderness, remarks,

Johnson abhors fat women. It’s a phobia with him. He actually gets nauseous.”

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

The Devil’s Virgin

devilsvirgin

The Devil’s Virgin (Lucifer Cove Book 3)
Virginia Coffman | Pinnacle Books | 1978 | 214 pages

On holiday break, eighteen-year-old student Diane Deeth travels to Lucifer Cove, the mysterious spa dedicated to the pursuit of hedonism on the secluded coast south of San Francisco, to check on the health and well being of her mother. Christine Deeth, leaving a broken marriage and her two children behind, previously checked in to the resort to calm her troubled nerves, but has since been unwilling, or seemingly unable, to leave.

Diane meets Bill Janocek, another outsider entering Lucifer Cove with his own agenda. Bill is the brother of Nadine Janos, High Priestess of the Devil Cult that performs satanic services at the Grecian-style temple on the hill high above the spa community. A freshly graduated cub reporter, Bill seeks to write an exposé on the criminal element drawn to the permissive lifestyle at Lucifer Cove. His main target is Warren Kittmer, a young Manson-like group leader who, although never been officially charged by the police, brags of his involvement in a thrill killing of a family in Los Angeles.

Diane finds her mother in generally good spirits, but notes that Christine seems unusually anxious for her daughter to leave Lucifer Cove. Diane suspects that her mother may be romantically involved with another of the Cove’s residents, and that the relationship may be at the root of Christine’s reluctance to return to her regular family life. Meanwhile, Diane spends much of her time weighing the potential of her own romantic possibilities. Although she develops a growing fondness toward Bill, helping him in his investigations, she cannot seem to resist the darkly magnetic charms of Marc Meridon, the elusive owner of a major share in the resort.

Since readers of the earlier Lucifer Cove novels already know of Christine’s relationship with Marc Meridon, the long drawn-out revelation comes as no surprise. The bigger mystery is why no one else at the resort would inform Diane of the identity of her mother’s love interest. Although Diane finds a dead body and experiences some supernatural manifestations, the main pull of the story revolves around implicating Warren Kittmer in the murders. However, the pimply-faced adolescent killer is such a minor character at Lucifer Cove that his eventual takedown bears little weight.

Nadine Janos also suffers from a lack of continuity from the previous books, disappointingly slipping back into a smaller, more caricatured role. She was treated to a full-blown, more nuanced character study in the earlier series entry, Priestess of the Damned. Even in her newly diminished capacity, Nadine still fails to be consistent in her behavior. She quickly turns from an aggressive disinterest toward Diane, to a full acceptance of Diane’s poorly conceived plan of attack on Kittmer and his group of followers—a plan that unthinkably calls upon Diane to lead Nadine’s cult service at the temple.

Even putting aside the supernatural elements and taking the book simply as a piece of romance fiction, The Devil’s Virgin has difficulty delivering any tension. Between Marc Meridon’s otherworldly hold over Christine Deeth, and Nadine Janos’ love-hate relationship with her Irish handyman assistant, Diane really only has one candidate to embrace—the “square” with the warm, muscular arms.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Priestess of the Damned

priestessofthedamned

Priestess of the Damned
Virginia Coffman | Lancer Books | 1970 | 222 pages

A time capsule of the occult-drenched California of the early seventies (perhaps existing only in the geography of the imagination), Book Two of the Lucifer Cove gothic occult series, features a sympathetic satanic priestess as protagonist. That alone makes the book hard to imagine existing at any other time—particularly after the “satanic panic” of the eighties, which seemingly sought to unearth a conspiracy of devil-worshippers behind every conceivable societal ill.

Nadine Janos, High Priestess of the Devil’s Coven, holds periodic rituals in the Grecian-like temple above Lucifer Cove, an exclusive spa and resort on the remote coast south of San Francisco. A returning character from the first book in the series, The Devil’s Mistress, she is revealed to be something of an outsider in this outing, trying to maintain an aloof status as conduit to Satan among the residents of the small seaside community. Not truly a believer in the package of goods she peddles to her favor-seeking flock, Nadine employs a series of visual tricks and acid-laced ritual drinks to inspire a sense of awe in her powers—and solicit greater donations.

Along with her Irish handyman (and sometime romantic interest) assistant, Sean O’Flannery, Nadine caters to lumpy businessman Buddy Hemplemeier’s wish for stock market success, Edna Schallert’s lonely middle-aged plea for attention, and Sergei Illich’s need to be desirable to his young lover’s eyes with staged spectacles. However, alone one night at the temple, she feels a strange presence and witnesses an otherworldly manifestation, making her wonder about the authenticity of her powers.

Nadine, for the head of a coven of Satan worshippers, seems strangely out of step with the rampant hedonism at Lucifer Cove, where drugs and sex define the treatment as much as time spent in the spa or hot springs. She makes a point in not partaking in the frequent opportunities for personal pleasures, which includes ignoring (except for the aspirin) the engraved silver box filled with a variety of designer drugs issued to the residents. Lost in the labyrinthine corridors during a visit to the spa, she actually turns and runs away from the lascivious advances of two of the resort’s masseuses.

An underlying fear for her independence as High Priestess marks Nadine’s wariness surrounding the intentions of the mysterious resort owner, Marc Meridon, who approaches her with a favor regarding his mistress, Christine Deeth. Nadine also suspects a vague threat in the form of Dr. Erich Haupt, the German doctor (and Hitler look alike) from the spa’s clinic, who doubles as master of ceremonies for many of the resort’s Bacchanalian celebrations.

Although Nadine experiences some unexplained phenomenon in her temple, watches the club’s greasy gigolo die in mysterious circumstances, and discovers some evidence pointing to a celebrity body-snatching ring, Priestess of the Damned succeeds mainly as a character study. The threads of an overarching story are as elusive as the club’s resident cat, Kinkajou, and mainly serve to further the lingering question for future installments, “Who exactly is Marc Meridon and what really is going on at Lucifer Cove?

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Satan’s Coast

satanscoast

Satan’s Coast
Elsie Lee | Lancer Books | 1969 | 254 pages

After the sudden death of her husband, Bartolomeu, Nell Valentim takes her fifteen-year old stepson, Chris, to live in her newly inherited family estate on the Portuguese coast. A ramshackle series of additions to the original castle built up over the last few hundred years, the run-down estate named Costa Demonio was seemingly the only item of value possessed by her late husband. Leaving New York to live rent-free in Portugal, the now strapped-for-cash Nell wonders if Bart’s great-uncle Sansao—from whom he inherited Costa Demonio—hid a secret stash of valuables somewhere on the grounds of the estate, since during his lifetime he had the reputation of possessing a great personal wealth.

Upon arrival at Costa Demonio, Nell is greeted with a less-than-expected courtesy toward its new owner. Damon Lord, an English tenant living in a farmhouse on the property, tries to convince Nell that the castle is uninhabitable, and that she must leave at once. A previously unknown cousin, Alexi Valentim, comes forward to warn Nell away from exploring any of the original structures, citing a concern for her personal safety. Even Huberto, the old caretaker, seems to treat her with disdain, reserving any respect for her stepson, whom he considers to be the true dom of the estate. The family’s local agent and lawyer not only seems to be unaware of Nell’s visit, but of her very existence.

During one of her first nights at Costa Demonio, Nell sees flashing lights on the estate grounds, and a mysterious boat braving the jagged coastal outcroppings to enter the small harbor during a storm. Because of the region’s history of piracy, Nell immediately assumes that a smuggling operation is being conducted through the property, and that the behavior of her new acquaintances implicates them in the suspected crimes. Determined to expose the operation, she ignores all her previous warnings and begins a search for secret tunnels and hidden storehouses in the old castle.

A tepid thriller, Satan’s Coast distinguishes itself from other genre entries through its heroine’s self-awareness of conventions [or maybe she’s just a good detective rather than an avid reader of romance paperbacks]. After witnessing a few mysterious lights and a boat offshore, Nell immediately deduces what, in other Gothic romances, is often revealed in the denouement as the source of mysterious doings in similar old castle locations—namely, a smuggling operation. However, Satan’s Coast doesn’t have much left to offer, with few twists along the way other than the disclosure of who exactly will be implicated when Interpol finally arrives [at least hide something in one character’s artificial foot, if nothing more than as a red herring!].

Other than a blow to the head during an investigation of possible secret tunnel locations, Nell is never really is much imminent danger. Although the villagers fear that the castle is haunted, there aren’t even any ghostly specters to liven up another day of gardening and assembling one-thousand-piece jigsaw puzzles. The fate of Bart’s first wife, Cecily, could have provided a foundation for an ongoing undercurrent of tension, with Nell fearing that history will repeat itself, but even that potential remains mostly undeveloped.

Perhaps the greatest loss comes in the anticlimactic photo-shoot that Nell, a former fashion model, organizes on the grounds of Costa Demonio to thwart the suspected smuggling operation. A classic case of all dressed up and nowhere to go, the long-weekend event at the castle, filled with a roster of supermodels, ends with a square dance and a round of polite goodbyes.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

The Girl from Yesterday

girlfromyesterday

The Girl From Yesterday
Sarah Hughart | Avon Books | 1970 | 190 pages

During an impulsive visit to a psychic in New York City’s Upper West Side, young actress Gillian North learns that she has lived six previous lives—and the first five lives all ended with her murder! The sixth and latest incarnation, precisely detailed by the psychic, was in the person of Caresse LeClair, daughter of notorious nineteenth-century New Orleans voodoo Queen, Marie Laveau. Although Caresse’s ultimate fate remains a mystery, her unexplained disappearance suggests a sixth case of foul play.

As her Broadway show nears the end of its run, Gillian’s performances are plagued by an increasing lack of focus. Becoming distracted to the point of forgetting her lines, she suffers from a recurring drumming sound in her head. Convinced the pounding is the insistent call of voodoo drums calling her forth to discover the secret fate of her last reincarnated life, Gillian packs a few old suitcases and travels to New Orleans.

Upon her arrival, Gillian rents a room in a former carriage house that was once occupied by Caresse LeClair. With the help of her new neighbor, Ashley Talbot, a history teacher and local historian, she learns more about her former self. Although raised by Hobert Breaux, a prominent plantation owner, Caresse was of a mixed-race heritage and occupied a low position in the social stratum, elevated only by her association with the Breaux family. According to local tradition, she was involved in a love triangle with Hobert’s two sons, Beau and Lance, which eventually ended with her murder at the hands of the jealous Beau.

On her first night in the old carriage house room that belonged to Caresse, Gillian is attacked and nearly strangled by a scarred, phantom attacker. Convinced that discovering Caresse’s fate will prevent the fatal history from repeating itself, Gillian sets out to investigate. She meets Andre Breaux and his aunt Claudine, the last living members of the crumbling Breaux family dynasty. Andre is immediately charmed by Gillian, and invites her stay at the family’s plantation house, the grounds of which reputedly hold Caresse’s remains, vowing to assist her in her quest to uncover the family’s dark history.

After the initial attack on Gillian, not much else happens until the voodoo ceremony reveals all at the conclusion. The southern Louisiana setting provides a modicum of atmosphere, filled with ritual and superstition, with voodoo practitioners casting spells and (all too briefly) creating zombies. The “pretties” that aunt Claudine keeps in the attic also provide a brief, but creepily gothic distraction.

The Girl From Yesterday derives nearly all of its suspense from a game of (reincarnated) musical chairs, dancing its characters around before ultimately allowing them to settle into their assigned roles. Virtually everyone Gillian meets has a counterpart in her past life as Caresse, and the central tension in the story revolves around who will be revealed as the reincarnation of the killer.

Fortunately for Gillian, identifying the attacker becomes less problematic due to the convenient, distinguishing burn that scars his face.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

House on the Rocks

houseontherocks

House on the Rocks
Theresa Charles | Paperback Library | 1966 | 176 pages

Recovering in a private hospital following an accident that left her father, David, dead, Adele Phelim suffers a series of nightmares that makes her doubt the official version of the fatal incident. Convinced that David’s drowning death was not accidental, Adele struggles to remember the possible presence of a third person at the rocky cliffside beneath the family estate, before her own memory fails. Having received a near-fatal blow to the head from the rocks at the shore, or from the hands of a murderer, Adele fears returning to the House on the Rocks.

Her fears seem to be justified when she receives a poisoned box of chocolates at the hospital, but no one, including her personal physician, Dr. Rodney Tayne, seems to think of calling the police. In a strikingly unprofessional move, Dr. Tayne confesses his romantic interest for Adele.  Nothing says love more than seeming to confess, While you have been incapacitated in your hospital bed, I have been standing over you—longing.

Accompanied home by a young nurse, Adele finds a climate steeped in suspicion. Her stepmother, Deidre, stands to inherit half the estate, but has positioned herself in strong opposition to Blair Kennard, her late-husband’s partner, on how to continue with the family’s struggling flower business. Blair, a chemist who developed the formula for the company’s fertilizer products, had confronted David over tampering with his mixture in order to cut costs and gain profits. Deirdre’s cousin, Gaston Loire, worked as a photographer on a series of advertising campaigns for the company, and was Adele’s former suitor before David stopped the relationship—claiming that Gaston was nothing more than a gold-digging, romantic opportunist.

Aside from an attempt to break into Adele’s room, not much happens in the House on the Rocks, as new revelations—Deidre’s surprise pregnancy, Blair’s secret manslaughter charge, accusations of David’s philandering past—drive Adele’s suspicions toward one resident or another. The atmosphere is modestly menacing, but Adele is not much of a detective, searching for as many romantic leads among the suspects as deadly ones.

Eventually, a culprit reveals himself, an obvious love-interest emerges, and a creepy doctor is left to prey upon his emotionally underdeveloped nurse.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

The Devil on Lammas Night

lammasnight

The Devil on Lammas Night
Susan Howatch | Fawcett Crest Books | 1974 | 224 pages

Nicola Morrison learns to always heed the warnings of Hungarian gypsy fortune tellers, as she ultimately falls under the deadly spell of a new man foreseen to enter her life, a “man with dark hair and dark eyes”.

The man is Tristan Poole, the leader of the Society for the Propagation of Nature Foods, an organization that has insinuated itself into residence at Colwyn Court, the down-at-heel estate belonging to Walter Colywn, father of Nicola’s ex-fiance, Evan. Tristan has moved his retinue of twelve female followers into the manor house, ostensibly in exchange for treating Walter’s psychosomatically ill daughter, Gwyneth. But from the very beginning, it is clear that Tristan is not simply the head of a natural food group, as he makes a familiar of the family cat and works occult spells with his minions, positioning himself to take over the estate for his own nefarious purposes.

The Devil on Lammas Night suffers a great deal of time establishing several sets of characters , mostly extended family to Nichola—our expected heroine—before its narrative reaches the point of introducing the danger that readers already know. Walter’s cousin, Benedict Shaw, and his wife, Jane, move into the cottage on the estate grounds to further Benedict’s academic research. Nicola’s father, Matthew, and his young second wife, Lisa, also arrive for an extended stay, along with Lisa’s young children, Lucy and Timothy. They all slowly rotate around Tristan, with varying degrees of suspicion—or attraction.

Only after a character’s death, one-hundred plus pages into the story, does Tristan finally set his sights on seducing Nicola (and securing her fortune), setting into motion Evan’s attempt at uncovering Tristan’s secret and freeing Nicola from his grasp. All will converge on Lammas Night, ritual date of a pagan harvest festival and time of special meaning for Tristan’s Society. However, little suspense is generated along the way, with the cat’s welfare being about as compelling as that of any other character. Break free, Marble, break free!

Cheerfully, at the conclusion, the unexpected source of some deadly counter black magic, along with the revelation of the existence of multiple free-roaming covens across the English countryside, seem not to trouble the prospects of a happy wedding.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: