Tag Archives: Vintage Television Series

Night Gallery | Season 1 – Episode 6

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Night Gallery | Season One | Episode 6 | January 20, 1971

Segment One | They’re Tearing Down Tim Riley’s Bar
William Windom | Diane Baker | Bert Convey | Written by Rod Serling | Directed by Don Taylor

Down-at-heel sales director Randy Lane (William Windom) reflects back upon twenty-five lost years at a plastics company, as the world around him crumbles. His sympathetic secretary Lynn Alcott (Diane Baker) tries to save him from his failing work performance, reliance upon the bottle, and up-and-coming rival executive, Harvey Doane (Bert Convey). Lane’s most cherished memories, including those of his late wife, all seem to be inexorably tied to Tim Riley’s Bar, now closed and slated for destruction, yet another erased link to a past that can never be recovered.

Windom’s empathetic portrait of a man disconnected from the modern world drives a surprisingly sentimental episode, lacking the traditional “gotcha” punch at the end. In the face of everything Lane cares about being lost to time, comes the most frightening question of all, “Who will remember?”

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Night Gallery – Season 1, Episode 4

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Night Gallery | Season One | Episode 4 | January 6, 1971

Segment One | Make Me Laugh

After sixteen years on the club circuit, down-at-heel comic Jackie Slater (Godfrey Cambridge) seems to have finally bombed out. He meets Chatterje (Jackie Vernon), a self-proclaimed “klutz” of a guru [or as Chatterje pronounces it, “guh-ROO”], in a bar after a failed show, and receives an unusual offer. Chatterje has the power to create a miracle, and only needs a willing subject. Unfazed by the guru’s many disclaimers regarding his own inadequacies, and by the potential for unforeseen consequences created by this miraculous act, Slater desperately wishes for the power to make people laugh.

A fairly straightforward “be careful about what you wish for” cautionary tale, Make Me Laugh features an appropriately pathos-rich performance by Cambridge. The backstory of his bullied childhood, and the emptiness ultimately found in realizing his wish, reveals the melancholy counterpart to his comedy, but the tonal effort is undercut by the fatuous treatment of the guru. Wrapped in a turban resembling a curiously knotted pillowcase, Vernon’s miracle worker plays more like a bumbling sidekick of dubious ethnicity.

Playing the material mostly by the numbers, this segment takes the familiar path to an expected final reversal. Aside from a few nicely composed shots, this early directorial effort by Steven Spielberg shows little prescience of his trademark visual style.

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Segment Two | Clean Kills and Other Trophies

Big-game hunter Colonel Archie Dittman (Raymond Massey) tries to impart his ”whole world is a bloody hunting jungle” philosophy upon his pacifist son, Archie (Barrie Brown), by adding an unusual codicil to his trust fund. Unless Archie stalks and kills an animal, his potential two million dollar inheritance will be revoked. Unable to stand up to his sadistic father, who dismisses him as a coddled milksop, Archie agrees to the hunt.

When will Archie put down his whiskey glass and push back against his loutish, blowhard father? Never, because the Colonel’s comeuppance actually arrives by way of his servant Tom (Herbert Jefferson, Jr.), whose African heritage provides a convenient resource for a mystical revenge, the nature of which belies Tom’s own belief system.

The musings on the inherent violence in the world are just a set up for the anticipated final reveal, the most dangerous trophy of all.

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